Full Service Westside

Right here, in Muscatine, Iowa, we are offered regular experiences of wonder and beauty. Right here, on any given day, we are all offered the chance to share our gifts and talents for the good of others. Here, where we go about our days at work, school, and home, all that the world has to offer, both its blessings and challenges, can be found here.
In her book Wisdom Distilled from the Daily, Sister Joan Chittister shares this ancient wisdom about the power of being right here, right now:
A young monastic came upon an elder one day sitting among a group of praying, working, meditating people. “I have the capacity to walk on water,” the young disciple said. “So, let’s you and I go onto that small lake over there and sit down and carry on a spiritual discussion.” But the Teacher answered, “If what you are trying to do is to get away from all of these people, why do you not come with me and fly into the air and drift along in the quiet, open sky and talk there?” And the young seeker replied, “I can’t do that because the power you mention is not one that I possess.” And the Teacher explained, “Just so. Your power of remaining still on top of the water is one that is possessed by fish. And my capacity of floating through the air can be done by any fly. These abilities have nothing to do with real truth and, in fact, may simply become the basis of arrogance and competition, not spirituality. If we’re going to talk about spiritual things, we should really be talking here.”
Whatever your understanding of a transcendent power might be, whether you name it as God, Allah, the Holy Trinity, Buddha, nature, or Cosmic Love, the pathways of the spirit inevitably pass through the here and now. Daily life is where we experience blessings and woes, grace and ugliness, wholeness and brokenness.
Walking through the arboretum at Discovery Park last week, I found myself finally slowing down to notice just how alive the trees, flowers, and plants had become over the past few weeks. Passing a walker, I said, “Hello,” and “Nice day for a walk, huh?” To which the walker replied, “There’s nowhere else I’d rather be.” We went our separate ways, but the stranger’s words of wisdom stuck with me.
Here is where life is lived. Here is where signs of sacredness can be found. Here is where we all come into contact with one another, work out whatever needs working out, and take time to notice the turning of the seasons and the evolutions of life. Here is where we are called to love one another. There is a holiness to just being in the “here” that is unfolding all around us. While I can oftentimes get caught up with forethought or living in the past, my own spirituality is what always steers me back to the here and now. And every now and then, it takes a stranger who is also on the path to remind me, “There is nowhere else I would rather be.”

Full Service Westside