Full Service Westside

It’s usually about this time of year that my winter courage gives out. When it’s the third or fourth week in a row that we’ve had winter weather advisories and I feel cooped up and wrung out by all that an Iowa winter has to throw our way. I’m tired of ice and snow, of rock salt grime and dreary skies, of winter gray and white. I’m ready for a little bit of hope that things can change for the better.
So, it’s about now that I have a routine that helps me remember that spring is on its way. I look at my seed catalogues. If you’re not a gardener or farmer, you might not immediately get what I’m talking about. But if you like to till the soil, then you know that deep yearning to be outdoors and working in the dirt. Even if you’re not a gardener, I’ll bet that the very thought of green grass, trees with leaves, and flowering colors might be soothing to remember. My favorite catalogue is from the Seed Savers Exchange, a group out of Iowa that protects and sells heirloom seeds that are a part of our heritage. As I leaf through the pages of the magazine, there are red tomatoes and green beans and yellow corn shining from the pages. I get out a sheet of paper and plan where each seed packet could go and imagine the summer sun and the taste of fresh garden produce. And, in winter, I smile with hope.
I know the truth that the earth will go through its revolution, its rotation will continue as it always has, and the sun will return with spring. I know this, intellectually, but some days knowing something with your head isn’t enough. Some days you need to know something deeply in your soul. The seed catalogue reminds me that spring is coming, that warmth is coming, that there will be new life springing up from the very ground that is now frozen. That’s the thing about hope – it’s felt more than it’s known. And when you’re hopeful, the future is filled with expectation.
If you’re in a gray place in the midst of this gray weather, never forget this: all the great religions and philosophies of the world have proclaimed, in different ways, that hope is more powerful than despair. As a Christian, the image of a seed “dying” to bring forth a greater, resurrected harvest is at the center of what brings me hope. If you’re struggling to find purpose, never underestimate the power of a little seed to become a great harvest, in time.
The truth is, no matter how we feel about the future, that spring is on its way. Warmth and light and peace are on their way. Whoever you are, there is a harvest on its way for you. I’m hopeful it will be worth the wait.

Full Service Westside