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We live in an age of constant motion. It feels like folks are always on the move, always on the go, always behind the wheel, or taking on another project. Our kids are so much busier than I remember being. There are sports practices, concerts, dance recitals, and science projects, all on top of the steady diet of homework that must be done.
Sometimes work is busy enough that it seems like whole days evaporate. Time is a funny thing. We mostly don’t pay attention to it, but it defines and surrounds everything that we do and all that we are. To make things even weirder, modern astrophysicists have spent the last decade or so arguing about whether time actually exists at all, or if it is merely a human construct that our consciousness impose upon reality.
Those discussions are well above my pay grade. I do find it helpful that in the New Testament there are two words for time: Chronos and Kairos. Chronos is the notion of time that we all know. Old-timers might still call watches “chronometers,” that is time-meters. Chronos is the steady stream of time that we experience on watches, calendars, and backward in memory. Kairos is another dimension of time altogether. It’s more like a sense of timing. Originally, the Greeks used the word when it came to drawing a bowstring or weaving at the loom. To hit your mark in either place, you had to have a rhythm to your work. In the New Testament, it is used to remind us that there is a vertical dimension to our experiences. It’s kind of like the first day of spring – we might be able to read it on a calendar that spring has begun, but we’ll really get it when we experience the ground soften beneath our feet and the warmth of the sun upon our brows.
Sometimes it pays to slow down, even just a for a moment, to be open to what the Spirit is trying to teach us about being human beings in a world that has a greater purpose.

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